Top 10 Dandelion Root Health Benefits

The benefits of the dandelion root seem to stem from this weed herb’s tonic effect on the liver. Dandelions are very economical herbs considering that they are weeds that most of us dig and get rid of!

I have been eating dandelions for years.

Dandelions are great as a spring tonic for our bodies; it helps the transition from winter to the warmer season, by nourishing and balancing the blood so it will flow better and keep us cooler in the summer season.

10 Health Benefits of Dandelion Roots

  1. Dandelion root is Widely recognized as a liver tonic as it nourishes the liver.
  2. Recognized as a great blood builder and for the liver.
  3. Because of its high iron and zinc content, dandelion roots are often used as a treatment for anemia.
  4. Has mild laxative properties and is often used to help maintain regularity.
  5. Aids skin problems as well as detoxify poisons and toxic waste in the body.
  6. It is also a mild appetite stimulant; tea made from root and leaves can help relieve digestive problems.
  7. Dandelion root functions as a mild diuretic. Because potassium is often lost when using a diuretic, dandelion root is often a better choice for a diuretic than synthetic formulas.
  8. Lowers cholesterol according to some studies. Early results of at least one study show that dandelion root supplements may affect the cholesterol profile in diabetic mice positively by lowering LDL and triglycerides while increasing HDL.
  9. Its positive effects on the liver and digestion may help the effectiveness of other vitamins, minerals and nutrients.
  10. “Dandelion acts as a tonic to the system. It destroys acid in the blood. As it contains organic sodium, it is very good for the deficiency of nutritive salts, and is recognized as a great blood builder and purifier.“ from the book Herbally Yours

Dandelion root Nutrition

  • Filled with vitamins A, C, D and B complex.
  • Minerals are abundant too such as zinc, iron and potassium.
  • It is very high in calcium and other nutrients.

Dandelion History

  • They became known about 30 million years ago in Eurasia.
  • The origins of dandelion as a natural remedy can be traced back to 659 B.C. in ancient China. It was also used in Arabic, Welsh and European medicine and was eaten raw or as a juice or tonic.
  • Before 1000 AD the Arabs also used dandelions as a medicine.
  • European immigrants brought them over and cultivated them in North America.
  • “In the tenth and eleventh centuries, there is mention of dandelions used for medicinal purposes in the works of Arabian physicians.” – Columbia University.
  • There were Native American tribes that would chew on the dandelion root to relieve pain.

Harvesting Dandelion Roots

Time of year makes a difference when it comes to getting the benefits of dandelion roots.

Plant food or energy is stored in the roots and depending on when you dig them up affects your results.

A spring harvest will result in sweeter roots, while a few months later in the fall, the root has had time to convert the sugars.

The benefits of dandelion roots would likely come from a fall harvest, while sweeter roots might be used in culinary aspects of using this herb.

dandelion root coffee

 Roasted dandelion roots make a tasty vegan beverage in the form of Dandelion Root Coffee. – Learn how to make delicious dandelion root coffee with this simple how to article and stop cursing at this wonderful plant.

Also, the dandelion leaves and flowers are so good for us. Celebrate your Dandelions this year! Eat them.

Other Recipes with Dandelions

Dandelion Flower
Dandelion Flower Pancakes

 Dandelion Flower Pancakes -No milk or eggs, but lots of health and good taste. I developed it when I was unable to eat eggs or milk at all due to food sensitivities. Interestingly whenever I make these pancakes no one seems to notice the lack of these two ingredients.

 Dandelion Flower Syrup -You can taste the unique sweetness from the yellow petals. This is a great treat from your weeds and it is so easy to make. Pick your dandelions before mowing the lawn or digging them up for dandelion coffee. Or go out into the country and pick them in the wild away from pollution. Never use ones that have been sprayed.

 Dandelion Flower Cordial  – The word cordial sounds tasty, and it’s very appropriate in this case!

 Dandelion Leaves Tea – Made with the leaves — this is perhaps the easiest and fastest way to use a dandelion.

 Dandelion Smoothie – After almost passing out from a dandelion smoothie, Randy gives some practical tips to keep your dandelion smoothie palatable.

Learn More About Dandelions

Dandelion Leaves
Field of Dandelion Flowers

Dandelion Leaves Are a Free Amazing Superfood for You – Dandelions have a reputation as a weed but the dandelion leaves, flowers, and roots are actually very good for us. They are rich in vitamins and minerals and have many health benefits making them a free superfood. This plant has been used as a natural medicine and as a food by many people around the world for centuries.

 Dandelion Flower Health Benefits – The flowers do have health benefits in nutrients, just not as many as the roots and leave.

 Dandelion Madness – Every morning, particularly in the spring, you can catch me scampering around my front lawn in my bare feet. Yes this is fun and yes, this is actually good for you.

 Dandelions Benefits: A Celebration of This Spring Flower – Dandelions benefits cannot be dismissed as they have been used as food and for medicine for thousands of years. Every part of this plant is extremely good for you! There are many dandelions health benefits for us.

More Free Food For You To Harvest

chickweed
Chickweed, a Tasty, Healthy Weed for Eating

Chickweed, a Tasty, Healthy Weed for Eating – Chickweed is a tasty nutritious weed. Many of the weeds in our garden are food that I include them in my meals and let some of them grow as real food in my garden. ‘Little star in the mist’ is the translation of this weed’s scientific name, Stellaria Media, though “chickweed” is the most common name.

Cooking With Wild Plants – When the weather gets warm I get excited about picking wild greens (also known as Weeds).  All of my life I have eaten wild plants and you can too.

The Man Who Tried to Eat Canada Thistle – Randy has had various experiences with the wild plants in his yard and garden. Some of them are pleasant experiences, and some of them are not.  This story falls into the second category, find out more about it.

Good Weed…Bad Weed – Randy has had an on /off relationship with weeds recently and now he’s at it again.  This time his attention has now gone to yet another weed called Lamb’s Quarters.  This one’s not so pesky to your lawn and it tastes much better.   Actually, it tastes almost exactly like spinach – particularly when cooked – and again, it has all kinds of nutritional value and… it’s free.

100+ Superfoods

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READ: Superfoods – Over 100 of the Healthiest Foods You Should Have in Your Diet and learn more about the variety of Superfoods we think you should have in your diet.

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18 thoughts on “Top 10 Dandelion Root Health Benefits”

  1. you can get it at iherb.com and if you’ve never ordered there before, you get $10 off your first order (coupon code AGU725). I am also checking out the Dandelion root there as well as Burdock root.. 🙂

  2. There is a hug variety to choose from which do you recommend, and can a person like myself living with Chronic Kidney Disease take this or do you know of any other herbal remedies to help protect my kidneys as I am at 28% function

    1. I am not sure what to say about dandelion root and Chronic Kidney Disease. Best to get dome testing done. I could recommend my favourite dandelion root but would like to see testing done first. Let me know if this is something you are interested in.

  3. Hi! I recently started taking dandelion root extract by “Nature’s Way”. Can I receive the same benefits of taking an extract supplement form vs the tea?

  4. Admiring the commitment you put into your site and in depth information you
    provide. It’s good to come across a blog every once in a while that isn’t the same old rehashed information.
    Excellent read! I’ve saved your site and I’m including your RSS feeds
    to my Google account.

  5. I seen this on the shelf thought I would try it my stomach was feeling funny like I was getting sick well that’s wasn’t the case it was the tea I suffer from constipation
    all the time now I no it works. The ding weed does something great. 🙂

  6. I consume and enjoy Dandelion by making straight plain Dandelion ‘coffee’, wherein I roast the pre-toasted dandelion root granules/kibbles which I buy at the local health food co-op. I roast them till they smell good, which is typically at 350F for 10 minutes,….. not the other recommendations like 200F for 30 minutes,…. naw, I want it roasted and I want it to smell roasted,.. just like I roast chicken or in-shell pumpkin seeds(though lightly with pumpkin seeds, not to browning, … and so I’ll start them at 450F till they start popping, then reduce to 280 to 250F to finish),… might take 10 minutes.
    And then after roasting the dandelion granules to a nice toasty scent, enough for a bit of bitterness but not too much,… then, in cowboy style, I put about a tablespoon or less per cup of water, boil it all together, then let it settle for a few minutes,.. then strain out the liquid, then drink it, straight,….. and I swear, it’s powerful good n grounding,…. mineral rich it seems.
    Damn good! Whereas Coffea coffee is a drug,…. dandelion coffee is wholesome.

  7. As a child, I would gather the dandelions from my grandma’s yard in a big bowl. She would crisp them on the stove with butter and a little salt. They were delicious..better than popcorn! The thought of them makes me feel nostalgic…

  8. Diane Herrington, where would a person go to get tested to see how much to take? I am just getting started and want to do this right.

  9. I’ve been digging roots and making tea from my small farm for almost a year now. My friends and family think I’m crazy, but I swear by them. I started This because of the cancer fighting properties of the root, and have learned to love and enjoy the whole process. I dig up as many roots as I can from the older plants around my yard for 1-2 hours a weeks. I then cut them into tiny pieces and roast at 350 degrees for 45 minutes or until it smells delicious. Grind it up. I then mostly use a coffee pot and make 4-6 cups at a time. Or bag it in tea bags (much more time consuming).
    Never felt healthier.

  10. Sir,
    I ordered dandelion tea from iherb two month back but still not recevied . I am staying in Dubai.
    Sanjeev

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