Whole foods

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Pear Hazelnut Crumble

By |September 5th, 2013|

This is a very healthy dessert filled with healthy pears, coconut oil, oats and the hazelnuts which go so well with the pears making it extra yummy.

In the fall I picked so many pears from a friends tree that I had to get creative and this is one very yummy result.

Base

Ingredients:
5 cups pears

Directions:
1.    Core and slice pears.
2.    Place pears in a baking dish.

Crumble Topping

Ingredients:

3/4 cup brown rice flour
2 1/2 cups oatmeal flakes*
1/2 tsp. salt
2/3 cup coconut oil
1/4 cup coconut sugar or sucanat
1/2 tsp Stevia in 1/3 water
1/2 cup hazel nuts, chopped

Directions:

1.    Mix oil, sugar, salt and stevia/water together in a bowl.
2.    Add brown rice flour to wet mixture.
3.    Mix in well.
4.    Add oatmeal and mix in well.
5.    Mix thoroughly with fingers.
6.    Sprinkle on top of fruit.
7.    Sprinkle the chopped hazel nuts on top.
8.    Pat down firmly.
9.    Bake at 350º F. oven for approximately 40 minutes.

* Not all people who need to be gluten free have a problem with oats. For those that do there is an oatmeal that is considered gluten free.

P.S.   Pears are Powerfoods.  Read all about pears here:   Pears:  ‘Gift of the Gods”

P.S.S.  Make sure the stevia is the non bitter kind.  Stevia

More delicious crumble recipes:

strawberry crumble                                Strawberry Crumble

Blueberry Crumble

Deluxe Mango Crumble

Strawberry Crumble

Get more super healthy tasty vegan gluten free recipes and useful lifestyle tips sent to you once a week, subscribe to the newsletter.

You can also learn how to plan and prepare super healthy meals with my 2-5-30 Healthy Diet Online Courses.

Deluxe Quinoa Pudding (vegan & gluten free)

By |April 7th, 2012|

An extra special quinoa pudding made from my favorite grain that as we now know is really a seed.

Spring White Bean and Asparagus Stew

By |June 27th, 2011|

This White Bean and Asparagus Stew contains three powerfoods: asparagus, seaweed, and stevia.

Perfect Oatmeal Porridge

By |June 2nd, 2011|

Oatmeal porridge has been a traditional breakfast food for hundreds of years. On a winter day  it is so warming to have a steaming bowl of porridge with raisins.  In the summer I do not cook them just soak; see my recipe below.

I like the old fashioned oats as they have a fuller flavour and are healthier.  You can eat this as a raw meal or make it into regular porridge.  As they take longer to cook I often soak them over night but you do not have to.

oatmeal - gluten free

Oatmeal & Sultanas

Ingredients:
1/3 cup old fashioned oats (rolled oats can be used)
1 cup water
2 Tablespoons sultanas
Pinch of salt […]

Onions are Powerfoods

By |March 9th, 2011|

Onions for Better Health says WHO

Onions are full of protective phytonutrients, vitamins, trace minerals, quercetin (an important flavonoid), chromium, and unique anti-inflammatory nutrients.
 
 
 
“An onion can make people cry, but there has never been a vegetable invented to make them laugh.” ~ Will Rogers
 

Onions are:

  • Low in Saturated Fat, Sodium, and Cholesterol.
  • High in Vitamin C, Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Folate and Manganese.
  • The nutritional value of onions make them ideal for weight loss and maintaining optimum health.

Health Benefits of Onions:

  • Early American settlers used wild onions to treat colds, coughs, and asthma, and to repel insects.
  • In Chinese medicine, onions have been used to treat angina, coughs, bacterial infections, and breathing problems.

According to the Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research

  • WHO recognizes that onions help relieve symptoms such as coughs, congestion & respiratory infections.
  • Sugar and onion-juice form a syrup, much used in domestic practice, for cough and other affections of the air-tubes among children.

Green Onion as Alternative Medicine: 

  • It is mainly used as a traditional medicine for common cold.
  • It stimulates the respiratory tract and helps in expelling sputum (phlegm).
The onion also is a proven antioxidant and may be helpful in treating certain cancers.
 For the full report: onion
 
Copyright © Diana Herrington  You are welcome to share this article with anyone who you think may benefit from this information as long as you give credit to Real Food for Life by including the link to the home page www.RealFoodforLife.com  or the direct link to this post.

Green means Lean E-book

By |September 24th, 2010|

7 Health Principles to Simplify & Balance Your Life! 'Eating Green, Clean and Lean' cuts through the confusion, by starting you in the right direction with clear, simple health PRINCIPLES.

Diana reveals some of her difficult health story….

By |September 13th, 2010|

Eating Green, Clean and Lean E-book will focus on the 7 principles of health. Principle #1 - Eat Real Whole Food Diana’s health decline began early in life as she was often fed junk food as a child. She only recognized that fact after many years of suffering mysterious health challenges through most of her adult life.

Is Your Protein Powder Toxic?

By |August 30th, 2010|

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Consumer Reports Sounds the Alarm!  

Consumer Reports, one of the most trusted guides for buying reputable products, has found heavy metals in protein supplements and is warning you to use caution.

 Officials for Consumer Reports say they purchased 15 protein powders and drinks mainly in the New York metro area or online and tested multiple samples of each for arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury.

 The results were very disturbing, considering how many people consume these highly processed food products and how MUCH they consume per day.

 

 The results showed a considerable range, but levels in three products were of particular concern because they exceeded the daily exposure limits proposed by USP for arsenic, cadmium or lead. This is if you assume 3 servings per day which is the average for most consumers. Some eat more and some eat less. For many products, levels of those contaminants were in the ‘low to moderate range.’

Personally I would not find even low to moderate exposure acceptable considering how many other toxic products we find in our environment. We have enough health considerations just dealing with life without wondering about a product we specifically consume for health or fitness!


Cadmium exposure is particularly scary
because it accumulates in and can damage the kidneys, the same organs that can be damaged by excessive protein consumption. It can take 20 years for the body to eliminate even half the cadmium absorbed today. 

Imagine what will happen to the large group of teenagers and twenty-somethings wanting to ‘bulk up’ today.  They are the ones who eat a LOT of these products and who may be in for a very unpleasant surprise some time from now.

 
“This (Cadmium) is a highly toxic metal, and while there are some cases where decisions have to be weighed against relative risks, accepting that you have to be exposed to any cadmium at all in your protein drink after your workout is definitely not one of them.”
says Michael Harbut, M.D., director of the Environmental Cancer Initiative at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Royal Oak, Mich.


Even some plant sources can contain cadmium.  This is because of the heavy use of cadmium-containing phosphate fertilizers in commercial farming. Potatoes, rice, sunflower seeds, spinach and other leafy greens are susceptible, but this is not a problem if you are eating organic.


Below is the average finding for three serving of the protein drinks.

 


You can see that Muscle Milk and EAS were the most toxic brands while the whey products faired better than the rest generally. This is just a small sampling of products.  The protein powder you buy from the store may be better, but it also may be worse.

You can read the complete findings (5 pages) at Consumer Reports.


SASKATOON CRUMBLE

By |August 17th, 2010|

As you will know by reading my article The Best Berry, Saskatoons are my favorite and I am happy to eat them just as they are.  For fun I do enjoy a crumble or pie so here is the yummy crumble recipe.

SASKATOON BERRY BASE […]

Greens Are Good for Us

By |July 20th, 2010|

The very simplest place to start with getting greens into our diet is to eat one big salad each day and make sure it is filled with mostly greens.  

Greens are full of vitamins A, K, D, and E which are fat soluble. To absorb these vitamins make sure to add a teaspoon of dietary fat, such as butter, olive or coconut oil, nuts, cheese or salad dressing. This will make sure your body absorbs all of the vitamins in the greens. Vitamin K helps calcium and phosphorus bind onto the bone protein matrix.

  Greens
 MIXED SUMMER GREEN SALAD Greens 

Ingredients:
1 handful, spinach
1 handful, arugula
½ head, red leaf lettuce
½  head, green leafy lettuce
1 medium bunch of parsley
3 Celery pieces, chopped
1 medium cucumber, sliced in rounds
¼ cup pine nuts

Directions:
1. Mix greens together in a bowl.
2. Top with celery, cucumber and pine nuts.
3. Serve with Mint salad dressing.

TIP:  If you are planning on this lasting for the next day, do not mix the cucumber in.  Put it in a bowl on the side and add to each serving of salad.  A mix of the basic ingredients without the cucumber will last 3 days in the fridge.

LEMON-MINT SALAD DRESSING
This is a refreshing tasty dressing with a little mint flavour.

Copyright © Diana Herrington  You are welcome to share this article with anyone who you think may benefit from this information as long as you give credit to Real Food for Life by including the link to the home page www.RealFoodforLife.com  or the direct link to this post.

The Man who Tried to Eat Canada Thistle

By |July 11th, 2010|

Randy Does It Again

randy holding mouth small


I have had various experiences with the wild plants in my yard and garden. Some of them are pleasant experiences, and some of them are not.  This story falls into the second category.


During our recent set of interviews with Health Tribe Forum, Diana was talking with Stephen Buhner, a world plant expert. He explained that THISTLES are actually quite good for your health. He also explained in the same breath, that Chickweed (or Lamb’s Quarters) is just wild spinach. 


It happens that Chickweed and Canada thistle are some of the healthiest plants in my garden.  I like eating chick weed so was very interested in the thistle idea. I was intensely curious whether you could actually take away the prickles. I couldn’t imagine how this could happen.  Visions of millions of happy Canadians feasting on enormous salad bowls of this prickly plant filled my mind. I wanted to ask about Canada Thistle in particular but didn’t want to interrupt. Perhaps I should have.


I had also heard that you can either cook or blend thistles.  Blending is easier so that is what I tried. I pulled out several young plants (because that is what you are supposed to do) and just threw them in water and blended.


Amazing – the prickles were gone.  I could not feel them with my fingers in the blender or the few cautious drops in my mouth.


But the SMELL! It started drifting up even when I first started blending and got even stronger as I went along. Imagine blending up someone else’s smelly socks knowing you were going to eat the mixture! How does your body feel as you imagine this?  This is how my body feels several hours after I tried this.

bad smell food

The taste was not AS bad. It didn’t have a lot of taste to begin with but the aftertaste closely resembles the smell. BAD!  I did not throw up but was well on my way!


OK so I’ve learned I can’t eat Canada thistle like this.  But what was Stephen talking about? I will certainly ask him and do some research but perhaps you, as a member of the Health Tribe Forum or Real Food for Life, can help me?  Please leave your comments below. (You can even comment on how dumb I have been.)


This is what the Health Tribe Forum is all about – combining our own direct experience and inner intelligence with the knowledge gleaned by mankind over the ages and combining it with modern scientific understanding.


Questions that come up in my mind:

  • Does my reaction mean Canada thistle is not good for me, ever?
  • Would cooking or blending with something else balance this effect?  Maybe if the thistles were fried in butter and onions and a dash of salt!
  • Is there some particular compound in Canada thistle which causes this kind of reaction?

What do you think?

Cooking Beans and Lentils

By |July 2nd, 2010|

I am quite fastidious about the way beans are cooked as I do not like experiencing the common thing we all associate beans with…GAS!  So here is what I do:

Cooking Beans & Lentils

Ingredients:

Dried beans or lentils
Water

Directions:

  1.  Wash beans in cold water and soak overnight in three times the volume of water.
2.  Next day, pour off the water.
3.  Place beans in a pot and cover with water 1 inch above the level of the beans.
4.  Bring to a boil.
5.  Let simmer with lid ajar.
6.  Skim off the foam.
7.  Add more water if necessary. Beans should always be covered with water while cooking.
8.  Cooking time will vary according to the type, size and age of the bean.
9.  Most beans will need approximately 2 hours cooking time. Lentils will take between 30 minutes to one hour.
10.  Beans or lentils should be soft; this is when they are cooked.  This is the stage that you can salt and add other seasonings.  Do not add salt while cooking as above.

Learn 7 Ways To Avoid Gas from Beans

Get more super healthy tasty vegan, gluten free recipes and useful lifestyle tips sent to you once a week, subscribe to the newsletter.

Here are some very tasty vegan bean and lentil recipes:

Chili con Vege

Adzuki Vegetable Bean Stew

White Bean and Asparagus Stew

Butter Bean Dip

White Bean Vegetable Stew

Lentil Stew

Red Lentil Soup

Copyright © Diana Herrington www.RealFoodforLife.com