Quinoa

/Tag:Quinoa

Quinoa Arugula Salad

By |June 27th, 2014|

This is a yummy and nourishing quinoa arugula salad for any season. It is full of good protein from the quinoa and the pumpkin seeds. It is a whole meal in one bowl.

Ingredients:

1 cup cooked Quinoa
2 handfuls, Arugula
1 small handful Parsley
1/4 Red Pepper, chopped
1 small Cucumber, sliced in rounds
1/2 Avocado, chopped
5 pitted Olives
1/2 cup Pumpkin Seeds, roasted
1/4 – 1/3 cup Light Olive Oil Salad Dressing

Directions:

  1. Mix greens, avocado, olives and red pepper together in a bowl.
  2. Mix in Salad Dressing
  3. Mix in cucumber and cooked quinoa.
  4. Sprinkle pumpkin seeds on top.
  5. Now sit down and enjoy this delicious salad.

This is one  serving or if you are a big eater you may need to double the ingredients.

Tip: If you want to make extra for the next day, do not mix the salad dressing, cucumber or pumpkin seeds in. A mix of the basic ingredients will last 3 days in the fridge.

Here is my favourite quinoa:  truRoots Organic Quinoa 100% Whole Grain Premium Quality.

Note:  Arugula has many health and detox benefits. Because of this I often use it in my weight loss and detox classes.

More quinoa recipes:

Deluxe Quinoa Pudding

Quinoa with Pomegranate and Cashews

Quinoa Coconut Almond Porridge – Sugarless

Quick Quinoa Porridge

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Health Benefits of Quinoa – the Mother Food

By |April 10th, 2012|

Quinoa is not a grain so it is gluten free! It is a vegetable seed related to Swiss chard, spinach and beets. Quinoa is pronounced keen-wa not kwin-o-a.  It is full of health benefits and is filling like a grain but with much more protein. Learn about its ancient history, and preparing tips.

8 Health Benefits

  1. Gluten-free. Since it is not not related to wheat, or even a grain, it is gluten-free.
  2. High quality protein with the nine essential amino acids, the protein balance is similar to milk. At 16.2 to 20 percent protein, it has is more protein than rice (7.5 percent), millet (9.9 percent) or wheat (14 percent).
  3. Alkaline-forming. Although it is not strongly alkaline-forming, it is comparable to wild rice, amaranth, and sprouted grains.
  4. Not fattening! Only 172 calories per 1/4 cup dry (24 of the calories from protein and only 12 from sugars, the rest are complex carbohydrates, fiber and healthy fats).
  5.  Smart Carb: It is a complex carbohydrate with a low glycemic index, so it won’t spike your blood sugar.
  6. Great source of riboflavin. Riboflavin has been shown to help reduce the frequency of attacks in migraine sufferers by improving the energy metabolism within the brain and muscle cells.
  7. Antiseptic. The saponins from quinoa are used to promote healing of skin injuries in South America.
  8. Inca warriors had more stamina and quicker recovery time by eating these quinoa seeds, making it a truly ancient powerfood.
Trivia:
  • In South America they use the saponin removed from the quinoa as detergent for washing clothes.
  • The sticky, bitter, soapy film of saponins also keeps birds from eating the quinoa seeds off of the bushes. Scientists decided to create quinoa that didn’t have saponins and guess what? The birds ate it all.
  • Stalks of the plant are used in preparing bleach or dyes, and dried stalks are used as fuel.
  • “Eat quinoa, food of the 21st century.”  These are the words written on the cover of each issue of an Argentinean science magazine called Temas.

I love the light flavor of quinoa. It is easy to digest and is not sticky or heavy like grains, making it a wonderful summer grain-like food.

Tips for Eating or Cooking:

  • Always rinse quinoa; place it in a strainer, then run cold water over it until the entire soapy residue has been washed away. You can taste test a few seeds; if they still have a bitter taste, run more cold water over them. Extra removal can be made by rubbing the seeds while rinsing with water. (Read why under: Use and Safety)
  • There are three main varieties: light yellow, red, and black.
  • Make quinoa porridge for breakfast, add it to your salad at lunch, substitute if for brown rice with your vegetables and make a yummy pudding.
  • Use quinoa flour in your gluten-free baking.
  • Even the leaves of the quinoa plant are edible; they taste similar to spinach, chard and beets.
  • Sprout quinoa; simply soak it in water for 12 hours, then keep it moist in a jar.
  • It can even be popped like popcorn and is very popular with Peruvian children.

quinoa in bag

Please note: Quinoa, though highly nutritious, is actually coated with the toxic chemical saponin; you must rinse it thoroughly. Saponins can be challenging to the immune system and stomach. Commercial processing methods remove much of the bitter soapy saponins coating quinoa seeds, but it is best to rinse again to remove any of the powdery saponins that may remain on the seeds. Like any good […]

Deluxe Quinoa Pudding (vegan & gluten free)

By |April 7th, 2012|

An extra special quinoa pudding made from my favorite grain that as we now know is really a seed.

Quinoa a Powerfood for You

By |September 20th, 2011|

Quinoa is pronounced keen-wa. This grain comes from South America with it's origins from the Inca civilization making it a truly ancient powerfood grain.

How to Cook Quinoa

By |November 2nd, 2010|

Quinoa comes from South America with it's origins from the Inca civilization making it a truly ancient grain. Quinoa has a high protein content, higher then other grains. Quinoa has between 16.2% - 20% protein, while rice has 7.5%, millet 9.9%, and wheat 14%. The protein quality is unusually high, making quinoa a complete protein. It's essential amino acid balance is similar to milk! It truly is one of the powerfoods.