bees

/Tag:bees

Mason Bees

By |April 13th, 2012|

Written by Gloria Brons

You might have heard – bees and other pollinators are in trouble!

Here is One solution to all the foods that depend on honey-bees for pollination […]

10 Ways to Save the Bees

By |March 20th, 2012|

Around the world the bees are dying.
Discover why, how you can help, and a bit of bee trivia.

If this trend continues 1/3 of our food crops will be in danger of disappearing, including foods many of us love…

  • apples, peaches, pears […]

Bees are Dying! Monsanto’s Roundup Blamed

By |March 27th, 2009|

Honeybee-On-Yellow-Flower

Around the world – the bees are dying.

If this trend continues 1/3 of our food crops will be in danger of disappearing,  including foods many of us love, like apples, blueberries, broccoli and almonds.

Bees may not be cute and cuddly like pandas but they are so much more vital for our own foods. One third of world’s agricultural production depends on the European honeybee to pollinate the crops at certain vital parts of the year. This pollination results in SEEDS like FRUITS and MORE PLANTS. There are not enough wild bees or bats to accomplish this. Crops like wheat, potatoes and rice do not rely on insect pollination but many fruits and vegetables could become so scarce that their price would skyrocket… IF you could get them at all. It would be a completely different world.

When the task force of scientists starting researching into this problem they found that sometimes bees were being killed by certain factors including,

a). Synthetic poisoning from insecticides and other pesticides.  This is now been well documented (see article below)

b). Infections from other organisms, like bacteria and viruses.

There seems to be an overriding factor decreasing overall health of the bees; thus making them more susceptible to poisons and infections.  What the scientists suspected and are still proving is that the bee’s natural defenses are being undermined by POOR NUTRITION and other unnatural living conditions.

Nutrition for bees might sound rather odd since they eat only nectar and pollen.  What has happened though, is that honeybees don’t have the VARIETY of flowers available to them because man has destroyed much of their habitat. We humans like our environment orderly so we clear the ditches of wild flowers and kill all the dandelion and clover in our lawns but to bees these areas are now nutritional wastelands.  The bee industry is hopeful that restoring balance to the diet and habitat of bees can improve their well being and prevent total colony collapse. Here’s hoping.

Where have you heard the word VARIETY in our diet before?  Probably from every dietitian and nutritionist who ever lived.   This is a principle of health and regeneration – that no single wonder food can solve all your problems. Rather you need a balanced diet of whole live foods.  We have such variety available to us in our gardens, farmer’s markets and supermarkets. Let’s all take advantage of that while we can!

Groundbreaking study shows that Roundup causes honeybees to starve

by NaturalNews

When honeybees come into contact with glyphosate, the primary active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, they lose their ability to eat and have a much harder time learning how to forage properly. These are among the many shock findings of a recent study published in The Journal of Experimental Biology, which for the first time demonstrates both chronic and acute effects in honeybees exposed to Roundup at real-life levels.

A combined laboratory and field analysis conducted by researchers from the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina found that Roundup exhibits harm at sub-lethal levels, meaning levels that don’t necessarily kill bees but that still affect them. Using the Apis mellifera type of honeybee, which is a primary pollinator in most agricultural environments, the team looked at how bees respond to trace levels of Roundup that match what they might find in a real-world foraging situation.

Based on these field-realistic doses, exposed bees were found to have reduced sucrose sensitivity, or a lowered ability to identify and track food. Exposed bees also experienced a drop in learning performance, as well as increased […]